Latest Commentary

Telcos, cable, CLECs continue to address the thirst for on-net fiber connections

He who has more fiber wins. In other words, the service provider that has a fiber-rich network is more competitive in the business and wholesale services race. In our new feature From AT&T to Fatbeam: The top 10 (and more) biggest providers of fiber in the U.S.FierceTelecom looks at who has the most connected fiber.

Lightower/Fibertech and Crown Castle/Quanta show insatiable hunger for dark fiber, but what deals are left?

It has been a busy week of consolidation in the dark fiber services space with two major deals taking place: Lightower Fiber Networks buying Fibertech for $1.9 billion on Monday and on Thursday Crown Castle snapped up Quanta Fiber Services (Sunesys) for $1 billion. The big question is: What's next in the dark fiber acquisition space?

Consolidation, net neutrality, special access and rights-of-way dominated the headlines at Comptel Spring 2015

This year's spring Comptel trade show in Orlando, Fla., once again reflected a competitive industry that's in transition. The show featured three keynote speeches from members of the service-provider industry and even a lawmaker: Representatives from Google Fiber and Sprint were keynote speakers, as was Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla).

Could the Nokia/Alcatel-Lucent deal drive Ericsson to broaden its portfolio with a Ciena, Infinera or Juniper buy?

Nokia has set off a new wave of consolidation in the telecom equipment market, reaching a deal to acquire Alcatel-Lucent for $16.6 billion. That move is now fueling speculation that Ericsson will make a similar move to round out its portfolio with more wireline capabilities by making a run for either Ciena, Infinera or Juniper.

Cable gets ready to take a big bite out of the wholesale market

Cable companies may still not have the same ubiquity or clout that incumbent telcos have enjoyed for years in the wholesale market, but it's clear that they are having an impact. In our latest feature, Cable hones its wholesale skills in special access and wireless backhaul, we take a look at how cable operators are taking on the wholesale services industry, providing services to a host of wireless operators, CLECs, IXCs and ILECs that need to fulfill out-of-territory service requirements for multi-site business customers.

Charter's Bright House deal could further disrupt competition in the Ethernet, business services market

Charter Business will instantly gain more clout in the business services and Ethernet services race if its proposed acquisition of Bright House Networks is a success. In addition, if the proposed acquisition between Comcast and Time Warner Cable goes through, Charter will gain various properties from both cable MSOs as one of the conditions of the deal.

Cable becomes emerging special access source for CLECs, but trails AT&T and CenturyLink's ubiquity

Cable operators are in an interesting position to drive new competition in the wholesale special access market, giving CLECs the ability to connect their multi-site business customers in areas where they can't economically reach with their own facilities today.

Verizon's small cell moves could provide backhaul bounty for Cincinnati Bell, FairPoint and Lumos

Verizon's intention to deploy more small cells to expand wireless coverage for 4G LTE could be a gold mine wireless backhaul opportunity for a host of regional telcos like Cincinnati Bell, FairPoint Communications and Lumos Networks.

5 reasons why AT&T, Verizon should see Level 3 as bigger business services threat

Level 3 Communications CEO Jeff Storey is confident that with the tw telecom acquisition firmly under the company's belt, it can now be a more formidable competitor against his main competitors--AT&T and Verizon--in the business services race. While AT&T and Verizon are still two of the largest enterprise service providers, Level 3 could become an even bigger threat to these carriers for five main reasons.

FCC's 25 Mbps broadband definition isn't dampening CenturyLink's investment plans

CenturyLink may be the third largest telco, but it is clearly taking a contrary view over its larger ILEC brothers AT&T and Verizon on the FCC's recent move to redefine broadband speeds to be a minimum of 25/3 Mbps.