Consumer Reports Reveals Annual Naughty & Nice List Of Company Policies And Practices Deserving Of Coal Or Kudos

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Ticketmaster, Time Warner Cable and BMW among others make CR's "Naughty" List while Home Depot, Oxo and PNC Bank play "Nice" in Third Annual Public Education Campaign

YONKERS, N.Y., Nov. 19, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Consumer Reports today unveiled its third annual Naughty & Nice List of company policies and practices. The companies cover a gamut of industries, including automotive (BMW, Honda) apparel (Kohl's, Nordstrom, Forever 21) and even hospitality (Drury Hotels). The annual Naughty & Nice list is not a Rating on an overall company; rather it's a "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" on a specific policy or practice. CR also acknowledges that the companies excluded from the list may have similar policies.

The full Naughty & Nice Lists from this year, 2011 and 2010 are available online at www.ConsumerReports.org/CRNaughtyNice.

This year, Consumer Reports is asking everyone to join in on the conversation by submitting their own personal Naughty & Nice nominee via Facebook and Twitter (#CRNaughtyNice). For the first time ever, Consumer Reports will also be setting up a booth at the Holiday Market at Union Square in New York City, offering visitors an in-person opportunity to submit their list and receive 24 hours of free access to www.ConsumerReports.org.

"We hope consumers will sound off and speak up, and let the companies they do business with know what they appreciate and what they don't," said Tod Marks, senior editor and resident shopping expert at Consumer Reports. "The purpose of this list is not to knock or commend companies as a whole, but to let consumers know they have choices at a time of year when shopping and spending are in the spotlight."

The Naughty & Nice Holiday List is based on input from Consumer Reports' reporters and editors who cover shopping, travel, hospitality, telecommunications and visitors to the Consumer Reports Facebook page.

The following highlights some of the companies from the Naughty and the Nice side of the 2012 list:

 NAUGHTY

  • Ticketmaster. The king of tickets will snail mail you your tickets for free if you have 10 to 14 days to wait for them, but if you need them any sooner you'll have to pay for expedited shipping. You'll even have to fork over $2.50 per order just to print them yourself. Gotcha!
  • Time Warner Cable. The Internet biggie joins a list of other providers to charge a monthly fee (in this case, $3.95) to lease a cable modem.
  • BMW. Getting stuck with a flat tire isn't the best way to find out your car didn't come with a spare tire or jack, but BMW owners may experience just that. The carmaker's models now come with run-flat tires or a Mobility Kit, which can get you to help after a minor puncture. The disappearing-spare syndrome has been spreading to include even economy models from Hyundai, Chevrolet and others.

NICE

  • Home Depot. Buy a new appliance from a home improvement giant and they'll haul your old one off your property without charge. The delivery crew will also uncrate, set up, level and test your new one.
  • Oxo. The innovative housewares manufacturer backs every product it sells with a no-exceptions pledge: If for any reason you are not satisfied, return it for replacement or refund.
  • PNC Bank. In Consumer Reports' survey of 10 banking giants, PNC was the only one to offer a free basic checking account.  What's more, the institution doesn't require customers to maintain a minimum balance to keep this freebie.

For additional information on how to find the best holiday deals and expert advice on top products, consumers can visit Consumer Reports' online holiday-shopping hub at www.ConsumerReports.org/holiday.

NOVEMBER 2012

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SOURCE Consumer Reports