AT&T puts Cary, N.C., on its FTTP deployment map

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AT&T (NYSE: T) has identified the town of Cary as the next destination in the state of North Carolina where it will bring its 1 Gbps-capable fiber to the home (FTTH) "U-verse with GigaPower" platform.

However, details of the new deployment are lacking. The service provider said that its plan outlines potential fiber deployments to deliver ultra-fast broadband to parts of Cary, but did not specify exactly what parts of the city will be the first to get the FTTH-based service.

"Our community is hungry for ultra-high speed internet, and signing the agreement moves us one step closer to ensuring we continue to keep Cary one of the best places in the country to live, work and raise our families," said Mayor Harold Weinbrecht in a release.

This is the fourth agreement AT&T has made with a North Carolina city. Besides Cary, the telco garnered an agreement with Raleigh earlier this week after signing similar deals with Durham and Winston-Salem. The telco still is still waiting for approvals from two other North Carolina cities: Carrboro and Chapel Hill.

These agreements are part of its partnership with the North Carolina Next Generation Network (NCNGN), a regional initiative focused on stimulating the deployment of next generation networks to North Carolina.

Besides North Carolina AT&T announced in April it would conduct GigaPower-related expansion talks with municipalities in at least 21 new major metros, including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Kansas City and Los Angeles.

According to company officials, future FTTP expansion will be driven by its ability to get permitting approval from local communities and getting access to necessary rights of way to lay fiber and install related network electronics.

For more:
- see the release

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