Fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) is a derivation of Fiber-to-the-x, which is a generalization of the several configurations of optical fiber use in telecommunications hardware. In FTTP communication delivery, the fiber is run from the central dispersal center to the premise itself, rather than deploying the signals through a cable pole, etc. The speed of the connection depends on the size of the Passive Optical Network (PON). The speed of the broadband delivery could be as high as 100Mbps, but there are installation challenges to be met.
Companies replace copper cable wires with optical fiber in order to provide the highest-quality internet connection to their customers. It's expensive to make this change, but an FTTP infrastructure provides many attractive options to telecommunications vendors, such as enabling them to bundle voice, data, and video services into one package.



Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Frontier challenges AT&T, Google Fiber in Durham, N.C. with fiber, copper-based video bundles

Frontier is taking its FrontierTV IPTV service to Durham, N.C. beginning in January, enabling it to more effectively compete with the growing threat from AT&T and Google Fiber.

Nelnet challenges Windstream, TWC in Lincoln, Neb. with new 1 Gbps service

Lincoln, Neb.-based NeInet is looking to shake up the city's cable and telco broadband duopoly of Windstream and Time Warner Cable with plans to offer a 1 Gbps FTTH service for residential customers.

FairPoint lights up 1 Gbps service for Portsmouth, N.H. customers

FairPoint Communications has entered the 1 Gbps fiber-to-the-premises game, announcing that it will deliver the higher speed service in Portsmouth, N.H., and a number of nearby communities over its existing last-mile network.

Frontier to add 200 employees to Durham, N.C. workforce as broadband, business services grow

Frontier has set an ambitious goal to expand its presence in Durham, N.C., including a plan to fill 200 new positions to support the telco's growing residential broadband and business service customer base in the area and its pending acquisition of Verizon's properties in three states.

Altice wants to bring FTTP to NYC to appease regulators, report says

Concerned that New York regulators will turn a jaundiced eye to its plan to wring $900 million in savings out of Cablevision, Europe's Altice is quietly pledging to bring fiber-to-the-premises to New York City, the New York Post said.

Hawaiian Telcom considers for rural areas as CAF-II boosts wholesale revenue to $17.2M

Hawaiian Telcom is making progress with its FTTH initiative, making it possible for nearly 60 percent of homes in Oahu to get the 1 Gbps speed tier while eyeing new technologies such as and VDSL2 to increase speeds on its copper network.  Regarding the sub headline and first sentence, as Scott said on the call, ~60% of our  enabled  homes are FTTH (so 60% of the 183K homes that we've enabled on Oahu). I just don't want people to misinterpret that with 60% of total census households on Oahu (~300K homes).-          Also I think Scott said that ultimately we'll enable 230K-235K homes on Oahu (no definite timeframe), though the bulk of it will be done by early 2017.  So in your fourth paragraph if you could take out "early 2017" that'd be great!  

AT&T to bring 1 Gbps FTTH service to 23 new markets

AT&T is deepening its 1 Gbps FTTH service reach in 12 metro areas across its wireline territories in the Midwest, Southwest and Western markets.

Telus' Entwistle: DOCSIS 3.1 won't impact the pace of our FTTP rollout

Telus is not afraid of the impending threat of cable competitors rolling out DOCSIS 3.1 networks and is ready to respond through its ongoing fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) rollout in its wireline territory.

CenturyLink drops 37K broadband customers as it tightens credit policies

CenturyLink's efforts to tighten the credit and collection policy on its broadband subscriber base may eventually enable it to reduce churn, but in the near-term it resulted in the telco losing about 37,000 customers.

Twenty six Colorado cities, 17 counties lift 10-year ban on municipal broadband investment

The municipal broadband movement got a boost in Colorado as residents in five cities and two counties voted to overturn a law that limited local communities from building a broadband business even in areas where incumbent telcos and cable operators have refused to upgrade facilities.