TWC updates TechTracker with Uber-like interface, delivers pinpoint position of installer

Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) just made life for cable techs who don't like to be micro-managed a little more annoying.

The MSO has patterned with software company Glimpse to update its TechTracker app to include location sharing technology that lets customers with services appointments know exactly where their assigned technical is in real time.

TWC is testing the new feature in Southern California and expects to roll it out across its footprint at the end of May.

"We continue to give our customers simple ways to easily manage service appointments on their own time and in their own way," said John Keib, TWC's executive VP and COO of residential services, in a release. "Utilizing Glympse's location sharing technology significantly enhances the in-home customer service experience and reinforces our commitment to on-time appointment arrivals. By providing real-time updates, it allows customers to conveniently plan for their appointments and eliminate any wonder about when the technician will arrive."

Similar to apps already launched by Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) and Dish Network (NASDAQ: DISH), TechTracker lets customers schedule service appointments and track service reps within an hour of their arrival time.

TWC debuted the app in October. It features an automated notification process with pre-appointment reminders and the ability to make changes to appointments.

The product is part of a larger TWC push to improve its sagging customer service reputation. 

For more:
- read this TWC release

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