AT&T realigns top management team

AT&T (NYSE: T) is reshuffling its top management deck, naming John Stankey as its new strategy chief and making other changes it believes will better position itself for new growth opportunities.

John Stankey, AT&T

Stankey

In addition to leading the AT&T's business solutions division, Stankey is well known for helping drive AT&T's wireless network build out.

"Stankey, who has led nearly every major AT&T business unit during his 27-year career, will be responsible for developing the roadmap to maximize future growth opportunities," AT&T said in a release announcing the changes Monday.

The service provider also made changes to its wireline division and technology leadership.

To capitalize on wireline consumer and business service growth, AT&T has appointed Andy Geisse as its new senior executive vice president, AT&T Business and Home Solutions. In this new role, the 32-year company veteran will oversee both the business segment and Home Solutions team focused on its U-verse video, broadband, and voice operations.  

With Geisse taking over the consumer helm, Ralph de la Vega will become president and CEO of AT&T Mobility. Current CTO John Donovan will take on the role of senior executive vice president, AT&T Technology and Network Operations.

Each of these executives will continue to report directly to current AT&T CEO and Chairman Randall Stephenson.

On the way out is Forrest Miller, who oversaw AT&T's M&A and corporate strategy. Miller is retiring after 30 years with the telco.

For more:
- see the release
- Reuters has this article

Special report: Wireline in the fourth quarter 2011

Related articles:
AT&T names Fujitsu to its metro, long-haul optical domain list
AT&T Q4 2011 wireline growth driven by ongoing video, broadband gains
AT&T's wireline voice declines drive more job cuts in Connecticut
AT&T launches cloud-based unified communications service

Suggested Articles

Arista Networks beat out some big names in its deal to buy Big Switch Networks, which came to light last week.

MoffettNathanson reports that the CAF II money that the incumbents received was typically more than the cost of the network builds.

Last year the number of data center mergers and acquisitions deals closed passed the 100 mark for the first time, according to a report.