Cable sees DOCSIS 3.1 as the competitive response to Google Fiber, telcos' 1 Gbps drive

Cable operators aren't running scared from the 1 Gbps threat made by Google Fiber (NASDAQ: GOOG) and a growing base of telcos like AT&T (NYSE: T) and CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL), but rather are fighting back with the DOCSIS 3.1 standard, one that Cable Labs says will support 1 Gbps over their existing hybrid fiber coax networks.

In its new report, From Comcast to Arris: Winners and losers in the cable industry's move to DOCSIS 3.1 and 1 Gbps speeds, FierceCable examines the cable industry's Gbps broadband initiatives.

The cable industry's movement to Gbps broadband services is underway. A number of cable operators, including Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA), Cox and Suddenlink, have begun rolling out Gbps broadband services in the markets they serve. While using a GPON-based FTTH architecture is part of their roll out plans, these cable MSOs will also leverage DOCSIS 3.1 standard-based equipment when it becomes available next year.

Suddenlink Communications recently announced that it was deepening its 1 Gbps buildout, extending service to an additional four cities in Texas: Lubbock, Shallowater, Wolfforth and Post, for example.

Check out FierceCable's new report, From Comcast to Arris: Winners and losers in the cable industry's move to DOCSIS 3.1 and 1 Gbps speeds, for more.

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