CenturyLink asks to retire more copper in Qwest territories

copper wiring legacy networks

CenturyLink has asked the FCC for permission to retire copper facilities in multiple markets within its Qwest territories, marking the telco’s ongoing transition to IP-based fiber services.

Specifically, the service provider asked to retire copper facilities across Qwest facilities in the East, South, Midwest and Western United States regions.

In the East, Midwest, and South regions, the telco asked to retire copper facilities in Alabama, Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. Over in the West, CenturyLink wants to retire copper in five states, including Arizona, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, and North Dakota.

Sponsored by Ciena

Because you asked. Adaptive IP™

There’s a new way to modernize and expand your IP-based networks—from access to metro—that’s automated, open, and lean.

The telco said in a FCC filing that “these retirements will have no impact on the copper facilities that will be retired.”

While the telco did not cite any protests to the copper retirement, it’s not unlikely that the transition could face protests from local CLECs or landline customers who still use copper-based POTS (plain old telephone service).

Fellow telco Verizon has faced opposition in various states over copper retirement. In March, Verizon locked horns with the New Jersey Rate Counsel over its opposition to retiring copper in the area.

Suggested Articles

BT Ireland and Huawei are laying claim to the first 1.2 Tb/s transmission real-time trial based on a commercial product platform in a live network.

Google Fiber announced this week it was pulling the plug on its 100 Mbps service to new customers in order to just offer its gigabit service.

MEF outlined an ambitious roadmap at last month's MEF19 conference that included deeper partnerships with cloud providers using the LSO Sonata APIs.