Cox begins lighting 1 Gbps service in DC Metro area

Cox Communications has begun rolling out its 1 Gbps Gigablast service for residential customers in Northern Virginia, making it one of the first service providers to offer such a service in the D.C. Metro area.

The cable MSO will be bringing the service to homes in Fairfax County, Va., as part of an effort to expand the availability of residential gigabit in Northern Virginia and other parts of its U.S. territory with a particular focus on new housing developments. This approach allows it to leverage and extend fiber it has already deployed.

As of this announcement, Cox has rolled out Gigablast service in 10 states and will have gigabit speeds in all of its markets by the end of 2016.

To date, Cox has launched Gigablast service in parts of Phoenix, Ariz., Orange County, Calif., Providence, R.I., Las Vegas and Omaha. 

Gigablast is currently available for Fairfax County residents at Timber Ridge at Discovery Square.

Eligible customers will be able to purchase the 1 Gbps service for $99 a month when combined with its popular service bundles. Customers that sign up for the service will also get a Wi-Fi router, one terabyte of cloud storage, Cox Security Suite and Family Protection, and 10 email boxes each with 15 gigabytes of storage.

Besides using FTTH facilities, the MSO plans to deploy 1 Gbps over its existing HFC plant starting next year. It is in the process of launching DOCSIS 3.1 lab and field trials next year, with plans to expand deployments in 2017.  

For more:
- see the release

Special Report: Gigabit Wars: The best prices for 1 Gbps service from ILECs, MSOs and municipal providers

Related articles:
Cox brings 1 Gbps service to select Providence, RI properties
Cox will face off with CenturyLink with 1 Gbps service in Phoenix, other markets
Cox takes on AT&T and Google Fiber in 1 Gbps fiber race
Comcast, Cox Gbps expansions further disrupt the broadband status quo
Cox Communications to bring 1 Gig service to Virginia

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