Cox names Jeremy Bye as VP of its growing wholesale group

Cox Business has put 21-year telecom veteran Jeremy Bye in charge of its wholesale and national account operations.

Jeremy Bye, Cox Business

Jeremy Bye, Cox Business 

As Vice President of Cox Business' wholesale and national accounts, Bye will be responsible for wholesale sales, sales operations and technical support options in addition to growing and managing the base of national account customers purchasing retail services from Cox on a market-wide basis.    

Before taking on this latest role, Bye oversaw network and Cox Business operations teams in the company's Virginia market since 2009. He began his career at Cox in 2002 where he led carrier access and service delivery operations in the MSO's New England system.

Bye cut his teeth in the telecom industry working in a number of engineering and operations roles at New York Telephone/NYNEX, now Verizon (NYSE: VZ).   

While Cox Business has become known as a growing competitive threat in the business services space, the unit actually got its real start as a wholesale provider to other carriers almost two decades ago selling to other ILECs and IXCs.

Wholesale continues to be a growing business for Cox Business. In 2011, Cox Business reported that wholesale revenues grew almost 30 percent and represent more than $100 million of the unit's $1 billion total annual revenue stream.

Some of the areas that will be on Bye's list to expand will be selling wholesale Ethernet to other ILECs and CLECs that need to fill in coverage gaps and, of course, services to wireless operators.

For more:
- see the release

Special report: Cable in the second quarter of 2011

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