Discovering the 15 highest-paid leaders in wireline telecom

Sean Buckley, FierceTelecomAs the wireline segment of the telecom industry continues to evolve, so has the pay of its ranking executives, and this year was no different. In our new feature, The 15 highest paid CEOs in wireline in 2013, we chronicle the salaries and compensation of the highest-paid individuals in our coverage segment.

Just like last year, Randall Stephenson, the CEO of AT&T (NYSE: T) and Lowell McAdam, CEO of Verizon (NYSE: VZ), took the number one and two spots. However, both of these executives saw their overall compensation drop to $22 million and $14.05 million, respectively.

Given the dynamic changes that take place every year in the overall economy, leadership transition, and the inevitable consolidation of the industry, we did see a few changes on our list. Outside of the two largest telcos, our report takes note of the leadership changes at other service providers such as Level 3 (NYSE: LVLT), Lumos Networks (Nasdaq: LMOS), and Consolidated Communications (Nasdaq: CNSL).

Jeff Storey, who took over as the CEO of Level 3 Communications from James Crowe in April, reported that his total compensation in 2012 rose to $10.6 million. Likewise, Tim Biltz took over the reins of Lumos Networks from James Hyde last April with $2.96 million in compensation, while Bob Currey, CEO of Consolidated, made our list with $1.3 million following his company's acquisition of SureWest Communications.

Larissa Herda, meantime, is one of the industry's highest-paid telecom executives, serving as the CEO and president of tw telecom (Nasdaq: TWTC) for nearly 15 years.

Take a look at the complete list and the changes apparent from last year.--Sean

Go to our new feature, The 15 highest paid CEOs in wireline in 2013

Suggested Articles

In the face of mostly flat revenues and competition from new startups, Cisco hasn't been sitting on its hands the past five years

New SRG data shows hyperscale operators accounted for 33% of all spending on data center hardware and software in the first three quarters of 2019.

Automating your network’s operational processes is the goal, but you can’t automate what you can’t see.