FairPoint remains tight-lipped about standalone broadband service pricing

FairPoint Communications may be continually expanding its residential broadband data services throughout northern New England and other territories it serves in the United States, but the service provider remains tight-lipped about how it prices its DSL and fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) services.

According to the company's website, the service provider offers three basic speed tiers: 4 Mbps, 15 Mbps and 30 Mbps.

However, other than saying that prices start at $16.99 a month for up to 15 Mbps, the service provider's website offers little, if any, information about its Internet speeds and how they are priced.

Asked about FairPoint's broadband pricing, a spokesperson told FierceTelecom the service provider does not disclose how it prices its broadband offerings. The spokesperson confirmed the company uses a mix of copper, fiber, HFC and even wireless technologies.

"We offer internet access to both consumer and business customers through a variety of technologies leveraging both copper and fiber infrastructure, including digital subscriber line ('DSL'), dedicated fiber and lit buildings throughout our footprint," FairPoint said in an e-mailed statement. "Certain of these services provide speeds up to 1 gigabit per second. In select markets, we also offer cable modem internet service, 'Fiber to the Home', and wireless internet access. We sell Internet service as both a standalone, managed or packaged solution. Many customers like to simplify vendors and utilize our packaged and bundled solutions to meet their communications needs."

Related articles:
FairPoint loses $43M in Q4 due to weather, labor strike
Comcast Business challenges FairPoint by deepening New Hampshire, Vermont Ethernet reach
NLRB rejects union challenges to FairPoint's contract proposals
FairPoint says vandalism on network has spiked during union strike
FairPoint puts contingency plans in place during northern New England labor strike

Suggested Articles

DevOps company GitLab said Tuesday that it has raised $268 million in a Series E round of funding, which brought its valuation to $2.75 billion.

While technology has changed a great deal since Cogent CEO Dave Schaeffer founded the company in 1999, he has few, if any, regrets.

The Fiber Broadband Association released a study that said all-fiber deployments were on pace to hit about 50% of U.S. households by 2025.