Frontier/Verizon cutover sees few glitches in Oregon

Frontier Communications (NYSE: FTR) may have run into some wholesale customer problems in West Va. when it transitioned the lines it acquired from Verizon (NYSE:VZ) to its own systems--issues that can be clearly attributed to Verizon's lack of attention to the network-but in Oregon everything appears to be on track.

In Oregon, a state that includes 300,000 POTS, DSL and 100,000 FiOS subscribers, the transition from Verizon to Frontier had minimal impact on customers apart from losing some online and DVR FiOS features.

Like its neighbor state Washington, local Oregon regulators also originally were opposed to Frontier's acquisition of Verizon's lines because they were concerned the ILEC did not have the knowledge to run Verizon's Fiber to the Premises (FTTP)-based FiOS TV and Internet service.

Of course, the real test for Frontier in the Oregon region will come when it issues the first customer bills for the original Verizon accounts this month.

For more:
- Broadband DSL Reports post chronicles development
- The Oregonian blog post also sounds off

Related articles:
Frontier's West Va. transition hits snags
Frontier sheds some of FiOS' online video capabilities
Frontier Communications charts a new course
Frontier wraps up acquisition of Verizon's rural lines
Frontier says West Va. Verizon's phone line cutover is on track
Verizon sets date to hand over rural wireline keys to Frontier
Frontier pledges support for FiOS customers
Union members held protest of Frontier/Verizon deal at FCC headquarters
Verizon-Frontier deal gets FCC approval
Frontier gets West Virginia's PSC approval for Verizon rural line purchase

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