GTA TeleGuam says it's ready to serve U.S. military buildup

GTA TeleGuam's CEO Dan Moffat is confident that when the U.S. military starts to redeploy thousands of Marines and their families from Japan's Okinawa to Guam--a process that will increase the country's population by 50 percent--the telecom infrastructure will be ready to serve.

While the military's $20 billion military buildup on the island has been heralded as a potential economic boom, it also has the potential to strain the island's infrastructure. During "America's Future in Asia" conference this week, Moffat dismissed any concerns, arguing that Guam will provide a perfect gateway between Asia and North America.

"Guam is telecom ready," Moffat declared. "Private investments have created a world class network on Guam."

Moffat's comments aren't totally without merit. Guam currently has 12 separate submarine cables with landing points in addition to 150 route miles of buried fiber rings that serve a host of end customers, including government buildings, large commercial buildings, schools and libraries.

In addition to Guam, Moffat maintains that they would like to expand their capabilities to the CNMI (Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands), a region where telecom service prices are high and options are limited.

For more:
- see the release here

Related articles:
GTA TeleGuam, government spar over IT&E's broadband stimulus applications
GTA TeleGuam adds another community to its FTTH buildout
GTA TeleGuam pumps $10 million into network infrastructure
GTA TeleGuam: Private and loving it - Fiber to the X
Fierce Telecom Leaders - Daniel Moffat, President and Chief Executive Officer, GTA TeleGuam

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