Infinera appoints Marcel Gani to its board of directors; Google accused of having an Internet search monopoly

Wireline news from across the web:

@FierceTelecom RT @ Cisco_Mobile: US government is starting to require a driver's license for the Internet. Article | Follow @FierceTelecom

> Infinera has appointed Juniper veteran Marcel Gani, who is now an independent consultant, to its board of directors effective June 9, 2014. Release

> Singapore's M1 Limited (M1) has launched a new 10G fiber broadband service, targeting the city-state's enterprise segment. Article

> WiGig, a technology that can deliver data transfer rates up to 7 Gbps while maintaining compatibility with other Wi-Fi devices, is quickly making its way into consumer devices. Post

Cable News
> AOL is reviving the Moviefone service it acquired in 1999 in an effort to become the "go-to place for TV listings" in direct competition with a number of services already sitting out there, either on cable set-top boxes or via mobile apps, such as TV Guide. Article

> North American digital TV growth will resume after a slight dip in 2013, and more than 5 million subscribers will be added by 2020. But even sooner, by 2015, satellite providers will generate the most pay-TV revenue, surpassing cable, a new report says. Article

Wireless News
> HTC expects to see stronger sales in the second quarter than the first thanks in large part to the success it is seeing in the market with its new flagship smartphone, the One M8, which went on sale at the end of March. Article

> Sprint prepaid brand Boost Mobile cut its pricing and introduced three new plans, including an entry-level $40 option that challenges T-Mobile US and its MetroPCS brand. The moves indicate increased competition in the prepaid space. Article

And finally… Google faces a lawsuit that accuses it of having an Internet search monopoly. Article

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