Integra Telecom appoints Kevin O'Hara as new CEO

Integra Telecom did not have to look too far to find its new CEO as it has appointed former co-founder of Level 3 (NYSE: LVLT) and company board member Kevin O'Hara as its new CEO.

O'Hara takes over the reins from Tom Casey, who previously left Integra only after only seven months on the job to become the CEO of pigment manufacturer Tronox, where he served as that company's board chairman.

Since 2009, O'Hara has served as a member of Integra's board of directors with stints as director, chairman and most recently as executive chairman. He will retain his board director title in addition serving as the service provider's CEO.

Jim Huesgen, who joined Integra in 2000 and has served as president since 2002, will remain as Integra's president and will report directly to O'Hara.

Like many CLECs that serve business customers, Integra was not immune to the challenges of the recent recession. Last year, sales declined 3.6 percent to $616 million.

The appointment of O'Hara, an advocate of the fiber-based services that Integra has been building out in recent years to appeal to larger business and wholesale carriers customers, including wireless operators, will provide some level of consistency.

For more:
- see the release
- The Oregonian has this article

Related articles:
Integra Telecom CEO Tom Casey leaves, enterprise business expansion continues
Integra Telecom passes CEO torch to CLEC veteran Tom Casey
Eschelon veteran Steve Wachter appointed Integra Telecom's new EVP and COO
Integra puts $11M into network in Midwest, Western regions
Integra Telecom brings aboard Level 3 vet Joe Harding

Suggested Articles

Deutsche Telekom announced on Friday that it has signed a cooperation agreement with Gigabit Region Stuttgart to expand and upgrade its fiber-optic network.

While the telecom industry has held its collective breath for the rollout of 5G services and apps, this year's deployments are on a slow roll.

The benefit of 5G for existing users and cloud companies is real; the benefit for service providers is less clear, according to analyst Scott Raynovich.