Internet For Everyone throws its hat into broadband debate

What would best be described as a collection of really smart, politically-influential folks has gathered together to form Internet For Everyone, a new organization dedicated to promoting broader broadband access deployment and adoption. The group includes FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein, a well-known advocate of rural broadband causes, Vinton Cerf, Lawrence Lessig and a host of other big names from the Internet and policy sectors. The effort is the latest of multiple well-meaning efforts intended shake up the broadband status quo in the U.S., where broadband is consider more costly, less available and slower overall than in many other countries.

Yet, the group has no plans to contribute its own policy proposals. It merely wants to focus on promoting principles that include "providing every home and business in America with access to a high-speed, world-class communications infrastructure; ensuring that people have an array of choices in their broadband providers; fostering openness so that consumers can practice free speech and commerce when online, and promoting innovation so the Internet can create jobs and foster economic growth."

That is exactly what a number of other people and groups want to do as well, and have wanted to do for several years. Yet, not much has changed. Good luck.

For more:
- read this story at The New York Times

Suggested Articles

LF Edge, an umbrella organization that's part of the Linux Foundation, announced the second release of its Akraino Edge Stack.

Chris Young is leaving his role as CEO of cybersecurity firm McAfee to become a senior advisor with TPG Capital, which has a majority stake in McAfee.

CenturyLink wins a $1.6 billion contract with the U.S. Department of Interior to upgrade its network services and modernize its IT solutions.