Mammoth Networks fans out DSL, service provider reach

Rural providers in need of an alternative connectivity source should rest easy as Mammoth Networks, a facilities-based competitive wholesale service provider serving mainly rural markets, has over 21,000 DSLs on its network and 160 service providers.

Mammoth contributes its scale to its network build out approach. Unlike other service providers that have only one DSLAM in each market they serve, Mammoth interfaces with Qwest at Layer 2 to reach multiple remote DSLAMs.

Being a facilities-based network aggregator, Mammoth will combine Qwest's DSL service with a mix of T1s, DS3, OCn and GigE connections from various service providers that is then served up one platform for service provider customers. And because it operates its own MUX, DACs, switches and routers, Mammoth's engineering support team can troubleshoot connections when they arise.     

This hands-on approach has resonated well with longtime integrated wireline/wireless independent phone company customer Inland Telephone Company. John Springer, Inland Telephony Company network and IT manager, said that "Mammoth's participation in our business has been a truly critical element in our growth, which was 100 percent painless as they do everything possible to make the rollout process seamless and easy."

While Mammoth may be far from a household carrier name, its ongoing rise and presence in rural markets as a middle mile provider will continue to be relevant especially as smaller independent carriers expand their respective data and even video offerings, but can't afford to purchase a high priced circuit from an incumbent carrier to connect to the larger public Internet and for backhaul.

For more:
- see the release here

Related articles:
Mammoth Networks gives rural carriers a touch of fiber
Independent ILECs go beyond the voice call
Fiber to the X: One size does not fit all

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