Mammoth Networks pilots Layer 2 Ethernet service in 17 markets

Mammoth Networks is enhancing its growing Ethernet product portfolio with a new Layer 2 Ethernet long-haul service.

Set to be initially trialed in 17 markets that stretch between Seattle to Atlanta, and from San Francisco to Chicago, the new service will combine Metro Ethernet service with long-haul Ethernet to ensure the service does not have to be translated back into a TDM-based service.

Typical of other Ethernet offerings, the new long-haul offering will provide carrier customers' handoffs from 10 Mbps to 10 Gbps in addition to latency and jitter guarantees.

It's likely the new service will resonate with smaller carriers that are looking for off-net Ethernet service to connect their multisite enterprise customers. Customers that sign up for the long-haul Ethernet product will be able to get access to Mammoth's relationships with 21 carriers and fiber access into 172,984 buildings.

While large service providers have well-established relationships with other service providers for off-net connectivity, smaller carriers typically have struggled to make these connections. But by going through a facilities-based aggregator like Mammoth could allow them to more quickly respond to opportunities in areas where it might not have an established partner yet.

In tandem with its long haul Ethernet product pilot, Mammoth added Justin Nelson, Founding CEO of Dash Carrier Services, to its board of directors. A 12-year veteran of the telecom industry, Mammoth Networks CEO Brian Worthen believes Nelson will be able to help steer the company into the next stage of growth.

For more:
- see the release

Related articles:
Mammoth Networks wraps up build out of three new aggregation POPs
Brian Worthen, President and CEO of Mammoth Networks, on being an alternative facilities-based reseller
Mammoth Networks fans out DSL, service provider reach
Mammoth Networks gives rural carriers a touch of fiber

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