Ovum says 10 Mbps has become the new minimum broadband speed expectation

When it comes to wireline broadband speeds, consumers now expect that a minimum of 10 Mbps should be the requirement to support their experience in surfing the web or downloading video or music.

New research conducted by Ovum revealed that there are three factors that support the best consumer experience: a minimum 10 Mbps download speed; a stable and reliable network that delivers content within 3 seconds; and customer service representatives that can resolve issues in the first call.

Perhaps not surprisingly, Ovum's research confirmed that users want a connection that can support SD and HD video services as a "commonplace application."

Michael Philpott, practice leader of Ovum's Consumer Services and co-author of the report, said that "demands on broadband service provided to consumers is compounded by the rise in connected devices" inside the home.

Philpott added that "Homes in mature markets were found to typically have up to four devices connected to the network, all of which have the potential to support a wide range of applications."

On a global basis, Sweden took the highest score for broadband experience in the 30 countries Ovum researched, while regionally Europe came out on top of the list. In addition to levels and growth in broadband penetration, high penetration that was coupled with poorer perception of the broadband experience pulled some countries back.

For more:
- see the release

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AT&T to extend 1 Gbps service to 11.7M locations following completion of DirecTV acquisition
FCC sets 10 Mbps as new rural broadband starting point
FCC's Connect America Fund II receives mixed response

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