Profiling wireline's worst-ever CEOs

Samantha Bookman, FierceTelecomThis holiday week, we invite you to take a break from yet another Detroit Lions football game, parades and turkey and take a gander at the wireline segment of the telecom industry's worst CEOs ever.

What does it take to fail spectacularly, bringing a host of others down with you? Incompetence? Corruption? Hubris? Plain old bad luck? Or a combination of all of these? Whatever the code for failure is, the leaders we profile in our latest feature sure got it right. For some, their actions led to prison; for others, fines; and for still others, nothing too painful--while their former employees lost pensions, investments, and paychecks thanks to their actions.

It's interesting to note that the majority of these CEOs were operating during and just following the dot-com bubble--a time that was ripe for grabbing profit, in a booming economy with plenty of wiggle room to make mistakes.

So, take a look at our new feature, Who were the worst wireline CEOs of all time? Relive the ups and downs--especially the downs--as these leaders brought their respective companies to their knees. And if there's a name on our list that you don't see, let us know in the comments.

As a side note, FierceTelecom will not be publishing this Thursday and Friday, Nov. 24-25. We wish you and yours a very happy Thanksgiving.--Sam

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