Recession becomes dial-up stimulus plan

We recently linked to a USA Today story talking about how some Internet users are switching from broadband to dial-up Internet access to save money in these tough economic times. This week, The Wall Street Journal has a story talking a bit more about the advertising promotions that EarthLink and NetZero, the two most prominent dial-up Internet access providers, are using to urge cash-strapped consumers to make the switch. Observers have argued that the dial-up business may get a temporary boost during the recession, and may hold off more precipitous declines for a bit longer, but no one is expecting a longer term dial-up revival.

You have to wonder though if some consumers will be convinced they don't need broadband. Is the extra speed really worth more than three times what they would pay for dial-up? It's a comparison that people who have had easy access to broadband have taken for granted, but now, it's a comparison many of them will get a chance to weigh. Meanwhile, if dial-up is good enough for a growing number of people watching their budgets, why isn't it good enough for markets under-served by broadband?

(By the way, the increasingly-used term "under-served" keeps putting the same image in my head: a half-full glass of beer.)

For more:
- The Wall Street Journal has this story

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