Rogers begins offering 1 Gbps service, but users say availability is spotty

Rogers Communications has begun to fulfill its promise to offer 1 Gbps broadband service in parts of Toronto, but customers sounding off in DSL Reports' Rogers forum say that availability remains "spotty."

According to one subscriber, a retail service provider employee said customers have to sign up online and wait for the company to call them to confirm they are eligible to get the service and activate them from there.

"Rogers reps at the store informed me they aren't at launch providing modems, sign-ups or service at stores, instead customers are directed to sign up online, whereupon they will be called and later activated by delivering the modem with "white glove" service," said DSL Reports member LSTA. "So it feels like another "fiber to the press release" announcement, and we'll have to see how this plays out over the next 2 weeks."

A number of other users noted that they checked several addresses for service availability, and these customers said they could not order the service.

Customers have been directed to check and see if service is available in their area at Rogers' consumer Internet site.

In October, Rogers announced plans to deliver its Ignite Gigabit Internet service to 4 million homes by the end of next year, challenging incumbent telco Bell Canada.

On its website, Rogers lists the asymmetrical 1 Gbps/50 Mbps Ignite service tier carried over its existing HFC network will cost subscribers $150 a month.

Although Rogers is not implementing usage caps on the tier, users do have to pay a $15 activation fee.

For more:
- DSL Reports has this article
- see Roger's Internet speed page

Related articles:
Rogers challenges Bell Canada with plans to roll out 1 Gig to 4M Toronto homes
Bell Canada invests $922M to build out 1 Gbps services in Toronto
Canada's CRTC to measure consumer broadband speeds
Telus' Entwistle: We're going directly to the premises with fiber

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