Sonic.net expands FTTH network deployment

Sonic.net, a competitive broadband provider that prevailed against a strong headwind of incumbent telcos and cable operators, is now expanding Fiber to the Home (FTTH) plans in Sebastopol, Calif. to serve more customers.

With the first phase of their FTTH network buildout complete, the service provider said that it expanding the network in areas where it sees the most adoption of its copper-based Fusion Broadband+Phone service.

"We are prioritizing our Fiber buildout efforts on communities where we see very high uptake of our Fusion Broadband+Phone service," Sonic.net said on its website, adding that "Sebastopol was our most enthusiastic community, with nearly 30% of homes opting for Fusion service."

Customers who reside in the markets where they have laid fiber will be able get speeds between 100 Mbps and 1 Gbps for $40 and $70 a month, respectively. The service provider launched the 1 Gbps offering last June, which reaches about 700 customers.  

Of course, Sonic.net's ambitions don't end with Sebastopol as it has set its sights on bringing the fiber service to San Francisco. In December, it applied for an application with the city's Department of Public Works to begin installing 188 Remote Terminal (RT) cabinets that would house the equipment to deliver the FTTH-based services to residential and business customers.

For more:
- Broadband DSL Reports has this article

Related articles:
Sonic.net eyes San Francisco as next stop for its FTTH build
Sonic.net adds video streaming to its growing service arsenal
Sonic.net to launch a 1 Gbps FTTH service
Sonic.net has no plans for usage based billing

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