Survey: 44% of Amazon's professionals say ethnicity is not represented in upper management

According to a survey of Silicon Valley companies by Blind, 10% of the African American respondents felt their ethnicity is represented in upper management. (Pixabay)

As Silicon Valley companies speak out against racism, they face in-house scrutiny over their own lack of diversity, especially in the executive ranks, according to a survey.

In order to check the pulse of Silicon Valley companies' diversity efforts, Blind asked its members to share their insights, which included 2,800 respondents, from June 6 to June 8. Blind is an anonymous professional network with over 3.6 million work-email verified professionals from Amazon, Google, Bloomberg, and Visa, among other companies.

Blind's results included only 10% of the African American respondents felt their ethnicity was represented in upper management or C-level executive positions in their respective companies. On the other hand, 76% of the White respondents said their ethnicity was represented.

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In particular, 44% of Amazon's professionals said their ethnicity was not represented in upper management.

Blind also asked this question "Does upper management at your organization demonstrate an understanding of racial differences in the workplace?" Among the answers, 24% of all of the respondents said personal values or moral codes were represented in upper management. Among White respondents, 31% said their personal values or moral codes were represented while 12% of African Americans felt the same way.

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For Amazon, 17% of its professionals said their personal values were represented in upper management. Additionally, 49% of the Facebook and Google professionals that answered the survey said their personal values were not represented in upper management.

Overall, 42% of the respondents said upper management in their companies demonstrated an understanding of racial differences in the workplace. For the White respondents, 47% said upper management at their companies understood racial differences, but just 34% of the Hispanic and 19% of the African American respondents felt the same way.

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