Telefónica International Wholesale Services to move all voice traffic to IP network

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Telefónica International Wholesale Services plans to have all of its voice services on its IP network by month's end. (Pixabay)

Telefónica International Wholesale Services is moving its voice traffic to its new IP international network by the end of the month.

Service providers have been working toward IP (Internet Protocol) networks for some time, and Telefónica is laying claim to being one of the first big carriers to move completely to IP once the voice migration is completed.

The Full IP International Network is the platform that Telefónica Group uses for all of its customers in order to meet current and future international traffic demands. IP networks allow carriers to offer improved flexibility, security and scalability to their customers. It gives carriers the ability to keep pace with increasing bandwidth demands and prepares their networks for digital services and applications such as big data, blockchain and IoT.

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RELATED: Telefónica updates SD-WAN infrastructure to include software-defined data centers

IP also provides a foundation for VoLTE and 5G services as well as virtualization, all of which allows Telefónica to develop an automation platform based on prediction and machine learning.

Last month, Telefónica International Wholesale Services announced it had completed the final stage of the automation and simplification of all its operations across some of its most popular services.

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