USTelecom: The FCC's new 706 report should show broadband progress

Despite a weak economy, USTelecom-The Broadband Association contends that broadband services are being rolled out in a "reasonable and timely fashion" and the FCC should come to the same conclusion.

Walter McCormick, USTelecom

McCormick: "...broadband is being deployed in a reasonable and timely fashion"

These comments are directed towards the FCC's soon to be published eighth annual 706 report on U.S. broadband deployment.

In its previous 706 report on broadband released last spring, the FCC argued that broadband was not being deployed in what it felt was a reasonable and timely manner. And while the FCC agreed that progress was being made, the previous report cited the fact that over 20 million people did not have a broadband connection and another 100 million did not subscribe to either a telco or cable broadband service.

Walter McCormick, USTelecom president and CEO, said in response to the FCC's findings that U.S.-based telcos invested a total of $66 billion in 2010 on expanding broadband, up from the $63 billion they spent in 2009.

"The commission's examination of broadband deployment in the United States must lead to the conclusion that broadband is being deployed in a reasonable and timely fashion in this next report," McCormick said in a statement.

For more:
- Broadcasting & Cable has this article
- see the USTelecom release

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