UTOPIA and Brigham City, Utah cited on Ookla's broadband NetIndex report

UTOPIA may be struggling to find a new financial footing, but users that reside in Brigham City, Utah are now getting the fastest connection speeds in the state.

According to Ookla's recent NetIndex report, one that compiles download and upload speed indexes of the world's broadband services, Brigham City, Utah customers were able to get an average download speed of 21.66 Mbps, surpassing Utah's 8 Mbps average.

Users can also get average upload speeds of 26.08 Mbps, which surpasses the Utah's 2.56 Mbps state average.

Not surprisingly, users that can get the UTOPIA service are happy about the speeds they can get from the FTTH connection. "I couldn't be happier with my UTOPIA connection," says Paul Roberts, a Brigham City resident. "The quality and price are great for the extreme speeds that are delivered. The community-owned UTOPIA network is something I can get behind, knowing I will always have a choice of providers, enough bandwidth for my needs, and the network is operated by people who are invested in my needs and not investors' pocketbooks."

Despite the customer reception to the FTTH service speeds and the latest ranking, UTOPIA's open access FTTH network has struggled from the start to gain a critical subscriber mass. Such challenges prompted UTOPIA last month to form the Utah Infrastructure Agency, an initiative that plans to raise $60 million to finish building out its network.

For more:
- see the release here

Related articles:
Utopia FTTH network looks to turn itself around
UTOPIA moves on Google's fiber communities RFI
Utah's Utopia: You want fiber, you pay for it
Utopia has high price for member cities, users

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