Verizon FiOS maintains top spot on Netflix's ISP speed index, but cable gains traction

Verizon (NYSE: VZ) has once again taken the top spot on Netflix's (NASDAQ: NFLX) monthly U.S. ISP Speed Index, maintaining its lead over a group of aggressive cable operators that are gaining ground in the speed race.

According to Netflix, December is historically the streaming video provider's "heaviest viewing month, with December 28 being the largest streaming day of the year."

Amidst heavy demand, Netflix reported that it saw increases in average speeds across the largest broadband providers, with Verizon topping the list with 3.36 Mbps, followed closely by Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) at 3.32 Mbps, and Bright House at 3.3 Mbps. All three of these service providers reported that these speeds were up from average speeds in the November Speed Index of 3.27 Mbps, 3.20 Mbps and 3.16 Mbps respectively.


Source: Netflix

Meanwhile, fellow telcos AT&T (NYSE: T), CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL) and Frontier Communications also saw some slight speed gains on the index.

AT&T's U-verse speeds rose to 3.02 Mbps from 2.94 Mbps, while Frontier was 2.18, up from 2.13 Mbps in the November ranking, and CenturyLink rose to 2.15 Mbps from 2.13 Mbps. Meanwhile, Netflix reported that AT&T, Verizon and Windstream also saw slight gains in traditional DSL services to 2.1, 2.07 and 1.8 Mbps, respectively.

For more:
- see this blog post

Related articles:
Verizon's interconnection deal with Netflix pays off with No. 1 ISP ranking
Verizon says it's working with Netflix to improve streaming quality
Verizon, AT&T improve ranking on Netflix's broadband speed index
Verizon FiOS speed drops in Netflix ISP index, despite peering deal

Suggested Articles

Vodafone Group has partnered up with Google Cloud to host its cloud platform for data analytics, business intelligence, and machine learning.

Colt Technology Services is now serving up high-bandwidth internet connectivity provisioned in near-real-time with the launch of its IP Access service

Customers want SD-WAN services, but they are confused by the Baskin-Robbins-like flavors that are available today, according to a Comcast executive.