Verizon's New York FiOS deployment is on course

Despite a slowdown in subscriber growth in Q4 09, Verizon has strong ambitions for its FiOS Fiber to the Premises (FTTP) network deployment and its related FiOS TV service. A key piece of its FTTP goals is to penetrate further into the competitive New York City market.

Last year, Verizon expanded the availability of FiOS TV into more than 140 new New York City neighborhoods, located in the city's five boroughs, bringing the service to a total of 810,000 homes. Since launching FiOS TV in 108 neighborhoods in July 2008, the service has been expanded to segments of 253 neighborhoods.

In targeting New York City with FiOS, a major piece of the puzzle lies in the ability to target Multi Dwelling Units (MDUs) with FTTP. Although Verizon has done some MDU deployments in Florida and New York City, analysts believe that Verizon is using New York as the guinea pig market for MDU-based FTTP deployments.    

Touting itself as a viable video and broadband competitor to area cable operators Cablevision and Time Warner Cable, Christopher Creager, president of Verizon's Northeast region, said that the company is on track to reach its goal of bringing FTTP to all parts of the city's five boroughs by mid-2014.  

"Rollout of FiOS TV is on the fast track in the city," said Creager in a release. "We've continued to add features and have made numerous enhancements to FiOS TV since we first launched it in the city.

For more:
- see the release here

Related articles
Verizon sets 40 percent penetration goal for FiOS
Verizon takes a bite out of New York's MDU market
FiOS: Verizon's shining wireline gem

Suggested Articles

Mirantis announced on Wednesday that it had acquired Docker's Enterprise business and team for an undisclosed sum.

IP Infusion announced on Wednesday that its DANOS-Vyatta software, which is based on AT&T's DANOS software, was ready for customer evaluations.

While telcos are, for the most part, embracing the TM Forum's Open APIs, software product vendors' implementations are lagging, according to a study.