Windstream extends enterprise services to the Las Vegas market

Windstream (Nasdaq: WIN) has brought its enterprise service suite to Las Vegas, a move that will clearly challenge both existing incumbent telco CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL) and cable operator Cox Business that have already been providing business services in Sin City for a number of years.

Area businesses will now be able to access Windstream's broad service portfolio, one that includes VoIP, SIP trunking, MPLS, and traditional TDM and IP-based Ethernet services. In addition, it will offer its growing base of managed services, cloud computing, disaster recovery and networking services.

The expansion into the Las Vegas market and the recent debut of its wholesale switched Ethernet product are two of the service provider's latest moves to advance its national footing in the medium- and larger-business market segment.

When it completed its acquisition of PAETEC last December, Windstream expanded its business service presence to serve 48 states. Along with Las Vegas, the service provider serves a number of other key cities such as San Diego, Phoenix and Tucson.

The service provider's emphasis on business services is already showing positive results. In Q1 2012, Windstream reported that the business segment revenues were $897 million, up 3.2 percent from Q1 2011. 

For more:
- see the release

Related articles:
Windstream steps up copper theft battle in Oklahoma with $25K reward
Windstream takes to the road for Merge streaming video, broadband product
Windstream Q1 2012 revenue slides 0.5%, but sees uptick in business services
Windstream hits new wholesale note with carrier switched Ethernet product

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