8 years and $350M in tax money going down the drain?

Broadband availability in North Carolina has been a hot topic of late, and it’s about to reach the melting point. On Wednesday, says Public Knowledge’s Art Brodsky, the state’s own e-NC, an agency that has been tracking Internet availability across the state and which has drawn praise from around the world for it excellence, will be made irrelevant by the same legislators who created it. In its place, enter telecom giant AT&T. It’s a move, says Brodsky, that shows “it’s now more likely than ever that the telephone and cable companies will prevail in their fight to control the information on which a national broadband plan is based.” Read the rest of his opinion.

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