Comcast brings home automation service to Denver market

Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA) is taking its Xfinity Home service to the Denver market.

Seeing an opportunity to enhance its revenue mix from its existing broadband and video customer base, the Xfinity Home service will provide users with a host of services, including home alarm protection, in addition to other features like the ability to adjust thermostats and remotely turning off and on lights.

Users can also develop personalized settings where they can get real-time e-mail or text alerts whenever a door is opened or closed or motion detectors report activity inside or outside of the home, for example.

The service also plays into the increasingly mobile nature of today's consumer with the inclusion of the Xfinity Security app that can be downloaded for free on Apple's iTunes App Store.

While the home automation market is still in an embryonic stage, Comcast along with fellow cable MSO Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) and telcos (AT&T (NYSE: T), China Telecom (NYSE: CHA), Frontier (NYSE: FTR) and Verizon (NYSE: VZ)) have been aggressively rolling out home automation services.

Initially driven by home security services, a new Infonetics study revealed that service providers are rolling out home automation services to increase average revenue per user (ARPU) and reduce subscriber churn.

For more:
- see the release

Related articles:
Infonetics: Home automation to boost operators' revenue, customer loyalty
Verizon taps InstallerNet to conduct installation of its home automation service
AT&T gets into the home automation game
Time Warner Cable puts iControl to work in its IntelligentHome service offering
iControl Networks finds entrance into Europe via Swisscom

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