Deutsche Telekom turns up vectored VDSL in 20 local networks

Germany's Deutsche Telekom has activated vectored VDSL for 20 initial local towns in its territory, a move that will allow it to raise VDSL speeds to 100/40 Mbps, reports Teltarif.de.

While the service activation, which will benefit over 200,000 consumers and businesses, was announced earlier this month, it still needed authorization from Germany's telecom regulator, the Federal Network Agency (FNA).

At the end of July, the telco provided the FNA with a list of 38,000 street cabinets that were earmarked as sites where it will deploy vectoring over the next year.

In 2013, Deutsche Telekom began the first phase of its vectored VDSL build to 57 local networks that would cover about 1 million households. Later, it launched an expansion program covering 82 local networks and some 1.4 million households for 2014.

To support its VDSL/vectoring program, Deutsche Telekom said it has built out 3,000 km of fiber in the past few months to the remote terminal (RT) cabinets that will house the last mile equipment that will deliver services to each home.

Deutsche Telekom has set a goal of doubling the total number of VDSL households passed from 12 million to 24 million by the end of 2016.

Earlier this month, the service provider said that it would cost $34 billion--including $13.4 billion in government funding and $20 billion of its own capital--to reach 90 percent of the country with higher-speed DSL, including its vectored VDSL service.

For more:
- Teltarif.de has this post (translated from German)

Related articles:
Deutsche Telekom says DSL expansion could cost $33.4B, considers acquiring small cable operators
Deutsche Telekom upgrades 2.6M customers to IP technology, sets pace for vectored DSL
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