Nokia, German provider M-net conduct 500G field trial

Nokia
Nokia and German service provider M-net on 500G wavelength trial. (Monica Alleven/FierceWireless)

Nokia and German service provider M-net are laying claim to the industry's first transmission of a probabilistically shaped wavelength.

M-net is the first carrier to trial Nokia's Photonic Service Engine 3 (PSE-3) coherent digital signal processing technology. Nokia said the PSE-3 is the first DSP to use probabilistic constellation shaping (PCS). PCS is a signal processing technique pioneered by Bell Labs that adjusts the optical signal to maximize the data-carrying capacity of an optical fiber over any distance, according to Nokia.

The field trial was conducted over a regional DWDM network spanning Bavaria as M-net prepares for the commercial roll out its new WDM network. M-net and Nokia hit 500 gigabits per second over a single probabilistically shaped 64-QAM wavelength in a real-world environment for the first time.

Sponsored by Ciena

Because you asked. Adaptive IP™

There’s a new way to modernize and expand your IP-based networks—from access to metro—that’s automated, open, and lean.

RELATED: Nokia off to a slow start in 2019 due to delay in 5G rollouts

M-net used PCS to shape the signal from its maximum capacity of 600G to a rate optimized for the specific fiber route used in the test. The high level of performance and flexibility enabled M-net to maximize the capacity of every network fiber, ensuring its backbone will meet the future demands of increased video traffic and 5G mobile broadband.

"We're excited to partner with M-net on the implementation of its new fiber optic backbone network," said Nokia's Sam Bucci, head of optical networking, in a statement. "The Technical University of Munich played a key role in the development of PCS, and the PSE-3 was largely developed at Nokia's R&D facility in Nuremberg, so it's only appropriate that the first field trial of PSE-3 technology would take place in Bavaria."

Suggested Articles

Amazon is putting the loss of the $10 billion Pentagon JEDI cloud contract squarely on the shoulders of President Trump, according to a filing.

Ericsson announced late Friday afternoon that it had agreed to pay $1.06 billion in fines to U.S. regulators after pleading guilty to bribery charges.

Amid a reorganization effort, Cisco is losing two key executives, including a former CIO and its top data center sales leader.