SaskTel deploys Zhone's MXK platform as part of voice network upgrade

SaskTel is leveraging Zhone Technologies' MXK platform as part of its ongoing movement to migrate its legacy voice network from TDM to IP.

Similar to efforts being undertaken by U.S. service providers AT&T (NYSE: T) and CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL), SaskTel says by modernizing its voice network it can not only achieve operational savings, but also enable the integration between its wireline and wireless networks and enhance the customer service experience.

Daryl Godfrey, chief technology officer for SaskTel, said in a release that "our revitalized network will enable us to evolve our architecture to IMS and better integrate our wireline and wireless networks."

While the initial focus of the MKX gateway deployment will be on its voice network, Godfrey added that the service provider wanted a platform that would allow them to provide an array of broadband services on the same platform.

Having a multi-dimensional device that supports a mix of broadband and voice will be key, particularly as the telco expands rural broadband coverage.

In March, SaskTel completed a DSL Internet program in rural Saskatchewan that extended services to 54 communities and provided speed upgrades to over 251 existing DSL-served communities.

At the same time, the service provider has pledged to invest $36 million in its fiber-to-the-premises program this year.

As a result of that plan, the FTTP program will pass 27,200 new homes while connecting 18,000 more customers to its infiNET network in Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw, Prince Albert and Swift Current.

For more:
- see the release

Related articles:
SaskTel to invest $36M in its FTTP program in 2015
SaskTel International serves up new SaaS OSS suite
SaskTel extends broadband service into three new rural areas

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