SIP trunking helped enterprise session border controller market hit $271M in 2014

Businesses' ongoing adoption of SIP trunking continues to be a boom for enterprise session border controller (eSBC) vendors, a market segment that saw worldwide revenue rise to $271 million in 2014, says Infonetics in a new report.

The research firm said that growth in the eSBC market is being drive by a number of factors: businesses' use of SIP trunking services, interconnection between disparate systems and support of remote workers and cloud UC services. This trend continued into the fourth quarter of 2014, where eSBC revenue reached $73 million, with 2.5 million sessions shipped.

"Enterprise session border controllers are increasingly being packaged as part of a larger sale of unified communications (UC) and contact center solutions in conjunction with SIP trunking," said Diane Myers, principal analyst for VoIP, UC and IMS at Infonetics Research, now part of IHS, in a release.

Leading the eSBC market from a vendor perspective were four vendors: AudioCodes, Cisco, Oracle and Sonus Networks (in alphabetical order).

Another issue with eSBC adoption is price. At $29, the average revenue-per-session for eSBCs is considerably lower than that of traditional VoIP-TDM gateways, Infonetics said.

From a regional perspective, North America led the eSBC market, taking three-fourths of total sales in 2014. However, adoption of eSBCs is growing in other regions, particularly Europe.

For more:
- see the release

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