Suddenlink lights up 1 Gbps service in 4 markets

Cable MSO Suddenlink has begun offering its 1 Gbps fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) service to customers in its 16-state footprint that includes Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas.

The new service will be available in Bryan-College Station, Texas; Nixa, Mo.; and Greenville and Rocky Mount, N.C.

Suddenlink's 1 Gbps drive is being made possible through a $250 million investment to upgrade its network through its Operation GigaSpeed program it launched last August.

Unlike AT&T (NYSE: T) and Google Fiber (NASDAQ: GOOG), which have focused on providing 1 Gbps service to select neighborhoods in mainly urban markets, Suddenlink is making its service to all homes it passes with its network in these four initial communities. It added that it plans to do the same in other markets where the MSO plans to launch the service.

Complementing the 1 Gbps launch, Suddenlink is also increasing other existing residential Internet tiers in these cities for no additional costs to customers. Existing customers in these four communities that subscribe to a 75 and 100 Mbps services will be automatically migrated to a 100 and 200 Mbps tier, respectively, but maintain the same price.

Being a traditional cable MSO that has an abundance of HFC plant, Suddenlink has been enhancing its DOCSIS 3.0 network to deliver higher speeds, including a 300 Mbps service it launched last June in two areas of Texas where there's growing competition to provide customers with higher speed broadband service tiers.

For more:
- see the release

Related articles:
Suddenlink to invest $250M in 1-Gig service
Suddenlink bolsters 1 Gbps service push with deployment of Arris E6000 edge router

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