Verizon won't implement a usage-based billing plan

With AT&T (NYSE: T) moving ahead with its usage based billing (UBB) plan for its DSL customer base, it's not hard to understand how speculation could emerge that Verizon (NYSE: VZ), one of three remaining RBOCs, would implement its own UBB plan.

However, according to a Broadband DSL Reports article, Verizon says it has no plans to implement a UBB mechanism for either its DSL service or FiOS anytime soon.

"This is something we have looked at in the past, and we'll continue to evaluate what's best to ensure our customers get the best broadband service for the best value," Verizon spokesman Bill Kula told Broadband DSL Reports. "We have no plans to implement usage-based pricing for our fixed broadband customers."

So how will Verizon deal with so-called bandwidth hogs? While Verizon said they are not against broadband usage caps, they believe their Terms of Service (TOS) enables them to deal with heavy bandwidth users, and even then they have yet to shut off any of them.

"Verizon terms of service were written in a way to allow us to terminate users if they violate our acceptable use policy, and excessive use 'could' constitute a violation," says Kula. "However, we've not disconnected any consumer, small business or mass market customers to date."

For more:
- Broadband DSL Reports has this article

Related articles:
Netflix rails against AT&T's proposed data cap plans
Analyst: Cable will likely mimic AT&T's usage-based broadband pricing plans
AT&T to introduce monthly caps on traditional DSL, U-verse broadband users
Streaming mad: AT&T sets DSL, U-Verse bandwidth caps

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